Windows 11: News, Release Date, Specs, and Rumors

Microsoft’s new operating system that is just being launched is Windows 11. With Windows 10 due to be retired in 2025. Moreover, it’s evident that a replacement is required at this stage. Beta version released later this year and will include a redesigned Start menu, a widget taskbar, and a new user interface. There are still some glitches being encountered by the general public like, Fix Windows 11 Start Menu Not Working Error. However, with the passage of time, these bugs and issues will be solved by Microsoft.

When Will Windows 11 Be Released?

On 24 June 2021, Microsoft officially announced Windows 11. The beta version was launched in July 2021, with the full public release scheduled in the fall of that year. Windows 11 will be available as an upgrade for existing devices, as well as with new devices that will be available for purchase around the holidays.

Windows 10 is often regarded as the final major version of Windows, with the operating system being handled more as a service that is updated on a regular basis. However, with Windows 10’s support ending in 2025, Windows 11 will be offered as a free update.

Windows 11 desktop main

This is what Microsoft has to say:

Windows 11 will be available on new PCs this holiday. Free upgrades to new Windows for eligible Windows 10 PCs will begin to roll out this holiday and will continue into 2022. Pre-release builds are available through the Windows Insider Program.

This confirms that new items will be released with Windows 11 at the same time that existing devices will be able to upgrade. If your device isn’t eligible for the upgrade, the quickest method to receive Windows 11 is to purchase a new device later this year when they become available.

Features of Windows 11

Major OS updates result in significant changes. This isn’t to suggest that Windows 10 hasn’t improved over time; nevertheless, a large version like Windows 11 wouldn’t be deemed major if it didn’t include some significant changes.

Beyond the little tweaks that have been rumored, such as softened corners, the option to delete preinstalled programs, and redesigned icons, there are these major concepts:

Updated taskbar:

From a leaked version of Windows 11 and official screenshots from Microsoft, it’s evident that this new Windows version is altering a lot in terms of looks, with the taskbar taking center stage. This involves significant UI changes, as evidenced by the screenshots below, which feature rounded corners, a revised Start menu, and taskbar buttons in the center.

New Start menu:

The Start menu is undergoing a makeover. The top section of this menu displays pinned apps along with a link to all of your installed apps. The lower section contains files, directories, and apps that are recommended based on your usage behavior. Sign out, lock, shut down, and other similar actions are also available here.

Windows 11 Widget Screen

Taskbar process isolation:

To some, this may not seem like a significant change, but when Explorer.exe crashes or glitches, it also crashes or glitches the taskbar. According to one theory, this new operating system would split the taskbar process from Explorer.exe, allowing you to instantly restart your computer from the Start menu even if Explorer crashes or malfunctions.

Battery stats:

If you like seeing battery usage data on your phone, you’ll like seeing them on your Windows 11 computer as well. According to the reports we’ve heard, you’ll be able to automatically activate battery saver mode when your battery drops below a certain level, as well as view consumption statistics for the previous seven days and 24 hours.

Flexible Store app:

According to sources, Microsoft Store standards would be eased, allowing developers to submit any program to the store. Apps that connect to a third-party commerce platform and apps that update via their own CDN are examples of this.

Android app support:

Windows can currently run Android apps through third-party emulation tools, but with this new Windows, native compatibility is coming.

Windows 11 desktop installed

Key Features of Windows 11

Aside from new features, switching to Windows 11 will result in a number of changes. On Microsoft’s feature depredations and removals page, they’re all listed, but here are a few:

  • Cortana: It won’t be pinned to the taskbar or appear during the initial boot.
  • Internet Explorer: The Internet Explorer browser is disabled. The Edge browser will take its place and works better than before.
  • S Mode: S Mode will be made available, but, only for Home edition.
  • Tablet Mode: The tablet mode has now been removed. However, new functionality and capability is included for keyboard attach and detach postures.
  • Apps: These apps will be kept if you upgrade to Windows 11, however they won’t be installed automatically if you do a clean install: Skype, 3D Viewer, OneNote, Paint 3D.

More Windows 11 Features to Know About

The redesigned interface is shown in the screenshots below, which were taken from a developer build of Windows 11 Pro. You can see that the taskbar has been totally redesigned, with a new Start menu, widgets menu, updated File Explorer and Control Panel icons, Microsoft Store, search tool, Settings, and a new setup method. Of course, because this isn’t a Microsoft official release, these modifications may or may not make it into the final build.

windows 11 dark blue theme main

Windows 11 System Requirements

The following are the basic Windows 11 system requirements for installing into your PC, as per Microsoft’s recommendation.

Processor1 GHz+; 2 or more cores; 64-bit processor or SoC
RAMMinimum 4 GB
Storage64 GB or larger hard disk space required
System firmwareUEFI, Secure Boot capable
Graphics cardDirectX 12 or later with WDDM 2.0 driver
TPMTrusted Platform Module version 2.0
DisplayHD (720p) display greater than 9″ diagonally,
8 bits per color channel

See Microsoft’s feature-specific requirements for Windows 11 for even more necessities that your computer must have.

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