7 Best File Managers for Mac to Supplement Finder

You would use Finder to browse Mac’s storage or access external devices. While it works just well for most users, there are times when I need to execute more complex operations like batch renaming, file synchronization across OS, or just use keyboard shortcuts. We discovered some more user-friendly Mac file managers that offer convenient features like dual-pane UI, sophisticated sync, and additional keyboard shortcuts.

Must Read: 5 Best FTP Clients for Windows and Mac to Move Files

File Managers for Mac

These modern file manager applications for the macOS operating system take the best elements of Finder and give them a distinctive twist. Let’s investigate them.

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1. ForkLift | Dual-Pane File Manager

One directory may only be browsed at a time with Finder, which is obviously a drawback. Drag and dropping files from one folder to another requires opening numerous windows, which is at best counterintuitive. With ForkLift’s dual-pane navigation, you may easily move files across two open directories in the same window. Additionally, a strong remote connection interface is provided to you, enabling you to access distant drives like Google Drive, Amazon S3, Rackspace, etc. Multiple discs can be connected, and file transfers between them are simple.

Forklift dual pane file manager for macOS

In addition, ForkLift offers a Menubar interface that enables you to perform rapid activities like establishing a connection to a commonly used remote connection with a single click. A lifetime licence for ForkLift costs $30 and includes a 31-day free trial.

Pros

  • Two-pane view
  • Connect distant discs and servers.
  • Quick action menubar application

Cons

  • Due to preparation concerns, file copies can take longer.

Get ForkLift for macOS (free trial, $30)

2. NameChanger | Batch Rename Files

You would already be aware of how awkward it is to rename files on Finder if you’ve ever attempted it. If you want to swiftly rename files with complex syntax, we advise NameChanger software. Twelve distinct change algorithms are available in NameChanger, including those that remove or insert characters, substitute words first or last, append or prepend, change case, and sequence, among others. By selecting the “Add” option, all the files can be imported. The original and final text can then be changed. Then, just click the rename button to begin the procedure.

NameChanger batch renaming on macOS

The use of NameChanger is cost-free.

Pros

  • 12 alternative syntaxes for creating bespoke names
  • Instant preview
  • Key shortcuts

Cons

  • Not an entire file manager

Get NameChanger for macOS (free)

3. Transmit | Efficiently Control Remote Drives

If your data is dispersed across numerous distant sites, using Finder to retrieve it all at once can be challenging. The advanced interface of the transmit file manager makes it possible to quickly and effectively transfer files while also accessing remote devices. Transmit supports all popular remote drives, including Amazon S3, Google Drive, Rackspace, Backblaze, and even older protocols like FTP, SFTP, and WebDAV, just like ForkLift. However, Transmit enables you to synchronise files between several discs and servers from remote to distant as well as local to local. Because of this, it is appropriate for users who must copy substantial amounts of data across servers.

Transmit UI on macOS

Transmit costs $50 and offers a seven-day free trial. Additionally, the full edition offers you access to Panic Sync, which enables you to quickly and securely sync critical keys and passwords over an encrypted channel.

Pros

  • Transfer information between servers and distant discs
  • Automatically sync data
  • Backing for the majority of big servers and discs
  • Use Panic Sync to sync your keys and passwords.

Cons

  • Dual-pane viewer absent
  • There is no menubar application.

Get Transmit for macOS (free trial, $45)

4. Dropover | Hold Files Temporarily

To access files when you need them but not immediately, Dropover is a great Mac file manager application. The program provides you with a temporary shelf where you can temporarily store your files. Drag the file from the shelf and drop it wherever you want when you’re ready. The nicest thing is that the window stays on top so, you don’t have to seek for it, and you can make many shelves to store various files.

Dropover

It is intuitive because there are three ways to trigger a shelf. By selecting and shaking the files, holding down a modifier key while dragging, and employing a global shortcut, you can make a shelf. Dropover has a 14-day free trial period after which it costs about $3.99.

Pros

  • The temporary storage of files
  • Automatic triggers to build a shelf
  • Organize as many files as you’d like.

Cons

  • Not an entire file manager

Get Dropover for macOS (free trial, $3.99)

5. PathFinder | Feature-rich File Manager

You would never use Finder again thanks to the remarkable capabilities added by PathFinder, a file manager for Mac. A dual-pane viewer, Menubar app, hidden file toggle, and native Apple Silicon support are available as starters. Additionally, the program includes modules that add additional features like a Hex editor, Terminal, Drop Stack, Git, Preview, etc. All of these modules are instantly available and can be inserted anywhere on the Path Finder window.

Path finder file manager with built-in terminal

Other minor features include keyboard shortcuts, tab bookmarks, keyboard shortcuts, a path navigator, a checksum calculator, support for Airdrop, batch renaming, folder merging, and file tagging. A 30-day free trial is offered with the $36 price of PathFinder.

Pros

  • Strong modules
  • Intuitive capabilities
  • Viewer with two panes
  • Stack Drop

Cons

  • No comprehensive support for distant servers

Get PathFinder (free, $36)

6. Syncthing | Keep Files in Sync Between Different Devices

A cross-platform program called Syncthing keeps files in sync across several devices. Simply install it across all of your devices, choose how many folders you wish to sync, and any changes made to the folders or directories will be immediately synchronized. The device must first be authorized before the data transfer may begin on an encrypted channel. With strong community support, the free and open-source Syncthing program is available on a variety of operating systems, including Mac, Android, Windows, and Linux.

Syncthing File Manager for Mac

Syncthing is cost-free.

Pros

  • Transfer of encrypted data across LAN and internet
  • Low-key interface
  • Sync as many directories as you like.

Cons

  • Only local drives can be synced with other PCs.
  • Not a native interface

Get Syncthing (free)

7. Commander One | File Manager on Fingertips

Popular macOS file manager Commander One has simple functions and simple-to-remember keyboard shortcuts. With a dark background and dual-pane directory browser, the interface is cutting edge and comparable to other apps on this list. On either of the panes, you have a choice of three layouts that offer you total control over how things appear. Additionally, the quick actions buttons improve the app’s efficiency by enabling you to quickly conduct things like unhide files, retrieve information, search, archive, and quick look.

Commander one mac file manager

Additionally, you can add keyboard shortcuts for every operation you can think of in a special section of the options. The Mac App Store offers Commander One for no cost.

Pros

  • Detailed hotkey configurations
  • Buttons for quick action on the toolbar
  • The toolbar’s quick-action buttons
  • Separate designs for the directory viewer

Cons

  • No real drawbacks

Get Commander One for macOS (free, in-app purchases)

You may also check out: Top 9 Mac Apps to Improve Productivity

Closing Remarks: Best File Managers for Mac

If you want more than what Finder currently provides, you should purchase one of these top file managers for Mac computers. from straightforward ones like Dropover to fully functional ones like Commander One and PathFinder. Which file manager best suits your requirements? Tweet it to me if you can.

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